News Archive

Physicists Uncover New Dynamical Framework for Turbulence

Physicists at Georgia Tech have proven — numerically and experimentally — that turbulence in fluid flows can be understood and quantified with the help of a small set of special solutions that can be precomputed for a particular geometry, once and for all. The findings reveal a new, dynamical framework for turbulence, with a wide range of applications, from more accurate weather forecasts to improving the fuel efficiency of cars and airplanes.

Three Faculty Named Blanchard Early Career Professors

The College of Sciences has named three new Blanchard Early Career Professors — Martin Mourigal, School of Physics; Dobromir “Doby” Rahnev, School of Psychology; and Yuanzhi Tang, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences — thanks to the generosity of late alumnus Elwood “Doc” Blanchard.

Lewis Wheaton Named Inaugural Director of the Center for Promoting Inclusion and Equity in the Sciences (C-PIES) at Georgia Tech

The College of Sciences is pleased to announce that Lewis Wheaton has been appointed the inaugural director of the Center for Promoting Inclusion and Equity in the Sciences (C-PIES) in the College. Wheaton, an associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences, is also an advisor on the National Institute of Health’s National Advisory Board on Medical Rehabilitation Research, among several other leadership roles.

Research Next Enters New Phase

With the research landscape rapidly changing, Georgia Tech must respond to external forces to address local, national, and global challenges and produce novel ideas ​and actionable solutions.​ In alignment with the Institute strategic plan, Research Next positions Georgia Tech to respond to future challenges with innovation, expertise, creativity, and a dedication to improving the human condition.

No Separations: Meet Ellinor Alseth, CMDI’s First Early Career Award Fellow

The Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection’s inaugural Early Career Award Fellow shares about launching her interdisciplinary postdoctoral research program and asks: Can a bacteria that’s “good at scooping up DNA” teach us about harnessing viruses to battle bacterial infections?

Researchers Unfolded Elegant Equations to Explain the Enigma of Expanding Origami

Researchers increasingly use a technique, drawn from the ancient art of origami, to design spacecraft components, medical robots, and antenna arrays. However, much of the work has progressed via instinct and trial and error. Now, a team from Princeton and Georgia Tech have developed a general formula that analyzes how structures can be configured to thin, remain unaffected, or thicken as they are stretched, pushed, or bent.

Researchers Unfolded Elegant Equations to Explain the Enigma of Expanding Origami

Researchers increasingly use a technique, drawn from the ancient art of origami, to design spacecraft components, medical robots, and antenna arrays. However, much of the work has progressed via instinct and trial and error. Now, a team from Princeton and Georgia Tech have developed a general formula that analyzes how structures can be configured to thin, remain unaffected, or thicken as they are stretched, pushed, or bent.

Robotic Motion in Curved Space Defies Standard Laws of Physics

When humans, animals, and machines move throughout the world, they always push against something, whether it’s the ground, air, or water. Until recently, physicists believed this to be a constant, following the law of conservation momentum. Now, researchers have proven the opposite – when bodies exist in curved spaces, it turns out that they can in fact move without pushing against something.

Robotic Motion in Curved Space Defies Standard Laws of Physics

When humans, animals, and machines move throughout the world, they always push against something, whether it’s the ground, air, or water. Until recently, physicists believed this to be a constant, following the law of conservation momentum. Now, researchers have proven the opposite – when bodies exist in curved spaces, it turns out that they can in fact move without pushing against something.

Now Online in the MCF: Inorganic Mass Spectrometry Capabilities

The Materials Characterization Facility (MCF) at Georgia Tech has installed a new inorganic mass spectrometry facility. It includes two new inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) systems: a Thermo iCAP RQ quadrupole ICP-MS for streamlined and high-throughput determinations of elemental concentrations and a Thermo Neoma multicollector ICP-MS with collision cell technology for the precise determinations of isotope ratios within a given sample.

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